Stanmore College inspires the next generation of female engineers

Stanmore College is determined to continue to increase the number of females studying engineering and. Women currently make up just 14.5% of the engineering and technology workforce in the UK, according to Engineering UK, and this contributes to the skills shortage and gender pay gap. The College is leading the way locally by providing opportunities for young females to gain hands on experience of engineering and transform concepts of science into applications that impact society.

Tuesday, 5th April saw an intensive workshop attended by young females from a variety of high schools. The students could not believe that, in such a short time, they had learned to connect electrical circuits, wiring, use LED and batteries and make their very own buzzer games. They heard how the general idea behind this procedure is widely used in real life from security alarms to automated number recording systems. Dr Afrouz Mehr, Stanmore female engineering teacher, delivered a session with the support of the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) team.

Aria, year 11 Avanti High School student told us “it’s been really good, the buzzer game was great and, earlier, we made a drone that uses propellers to move”.

15-year-old Whitmore High School student added ‘it’s made me want to do engineering, the teachers really knew how to explain it well and I would recommend this workshop. The circuit we made worked and started beeping just like the buzzer game you buy’.

 

The students also tested out electrical installation by setting up two-way switches linked to one bulb. Safety was paramount with teachers explaining and observing, low voltage usage so shocks could not occur, and insulated wiring. Our female visitors witnessed first-hand the outcomes and heard the noises created when wires in the circuits they had made touched. Kayla, one of our younger female attendees, told us ‘I just enjoyed every bit of it’.

The students also tested out electrical installation by setting up two-way switches linked to one bulb. Safety was paramount with teachers explaining and observing, low voltage usage so shocks could not occur, and insulated wiring. Our female visitors witnessed first-hand the outcomes and heard the noises created when wires in the circuits they had made touched. Kayla, one of our younger female attendees, told us ‘I just enjoyed every bit of it’.

 

The experience finished with a pizza lunch courtesy of the College.  Morale was high and a fresh air of confidence was palpable; the event had clearly demonstrated that aspirations, which previously seemed unattainable, were capable of being realised.

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